Wow, has it really been over a week since I posted last!? Unbelievable how quickly time flies. Too much stuff going on I guess. Not the least of which – I was asked to manage publicity for an Off- Broadway show entitled ‘Friction’ which is opening here in NYC on November 5th. I’ve never done work like this before, and I love learning new stuff, so its been an interesting few weeks. So far I’ve supplied the play’s tagline, the synopsis, press release and am organizating the opening night. Here’s the website if you’re curious or even better, in town, on any of the performance dates! www.frictiontheplay.com

Now to the topic of my post – developing a talent management program. I’ve found that this can, in general, be a daunting task for most organizations. First of all – if you’re embedded in a group, or division etc – you are in reality a team within a team. You need to manage your talent within a larger talent construct. If its the opposite and you’re at the top of the house, you need to corral the cats and ensure the folks down below fully understand and leverage what’s being provided to them in the larger structure. It’s tough any way you look at it, and more often than not the reality falls just a tick short of glory.

To help, I’ve included this one pager/graphic I’ve cobbled together over the last few years that for me continues to provide a blueprint and guidepost for the kind of program I always seek to create when positioned in a ‘talent’ role.

Generic Talent Model by ThePeopleStuff.com

I think its robust, cohesive, and flexible and, when I’ve been able to fully execute on it, it has worked for me a like a charm. Here’s why:

Other than quickly organizaning my thinking and allowing me to accurately assess a current state, this model helps to ensure a few key things:

1. I am addressing all phases of the employee lifecycle – Attract, Develop, Retain and Retire
2. I am ensuring close alignment to the overall business strategy and keeping management in the loop through creation of a Workforce Planning Committee – which consists of the senior management team
3. I am clearly indicating that ‘I can’t do it all’, nor should I, by outlining where responsibility sits with HR, and where it sits with my function

This can all, of course, be modified to suit each unique group and situation, but by leveraging a model of this kind – I assure that I don’t miss the important stuff AND it allows me to communicate clearly to all my key stakeholders in a simple and straight forward way.

In upcoming posts I’ll expand upon each component of this model – so please subscribe for the latest updates. Oh! And if you think you can make this better, or have a model of your own you’d like to share – please do!   I love feedback and believe as Emerson did that “Our best thoughts come from others.”

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